Dorion Mode

December 16, 2019

TMSR OS Mission and Vision Statements Genesis

Filed under: TMSR OS — Robinson Dorion @ 22:12

The TMSR OS mission and vision statements genesis seeds the tree of consideration and expression on this branch of thought.

Mission:

The mission of TMSR OS is to be a profitable implement for its implicit clients and operators to leverage in furthering capitalist economic interests and disrupting socialism.

Vision:

By enumerating goodness 1 and owning any software worth the mention under V, TMSR OS allows the operator to manage his investment of trust and sets the basis of a framework for full process insurance of the complete computing stack, from hardware schematics to BIOS to bootloader to kernel to compiler to key management and graphics software -- ab ovo usque ad mala.

The success of TMSR OS is measured primarily by the success and growth of its clients. Bitcoin is the sound money, unpatchable 0day to the socialist monetary system, Gossipd is the uninterdictable, undecryptable communications layer of the forum, MP-WP is the preeminent publishing platform, Eulora is, "the masterclass in economy masquerading as a video game" and with TMSR-PGP the operator manages his identity keys, i.e. generates keys, encrypts and decrypts, creates and verifies signatures.

Sharpening the capitalist computing tools necessarily means making the use of fake central bank 2 money trademarks and the fast food technology sillycon valley has been serving to support their inflation fueled real estate and ipo bezzle investments for the -ev misallocations they are. Everyone who has thought for a few moments about it knows the political and technological collectivism is unsustainable and TMSR OS accelerates the slaying of the socialist beast and assertion of the individualist, honor-based hierarchy to which the elite are productively defecting.

May this guide the cultivation and bearing of nutritious fruit and to the victor go the spoils.

To be continued in the comments and pingbacks...

  1. As M. J. Ranum puts it :

    Why is "Enumerating Badness" a dumb idea? It's a dumb idea because sometime around 1992 the amount of Badness in the Internet began to vastly outweigh the amount of Goodness. For every harmless, legitimate, application, there are dozens or hundreds of pieces of malware, worm tests, exploits, or viral code. Examine a typical antivirus package and you'll see it knows about 75,000+ viruses that might infect your machine. Compare that to the legitimate 30 or so apps that I've installed on my machine, and you can see it's rather dumb to try to track 75,000 pieces of Badness when even a simpleton could track 30 pieces of Goodness. In fact, if I were to simply track the 30 pieces of Goodness on my machine, and allow nothing else to run, I would have simultaneously solved the following problems:

    • Spyware
    • Viruses
    • Remote Control Trojans
    • Exploits that involve executing pre-installed code that you don't use regularly

    Thanks to all the marketing hype around disclosing and announcing vulnerabilities, there are (according to some industry analysts) between 200 and 700 new pieces of Badness hitting the Internet every month. Not only is "Enumerating Badness" a dumb idea, it's gotten dumber during the few minutes of your time you've bequeathed me by reading this article.

    Now, your typical IT executive, when I discuss this concept with him or her, will stand up and say something like, "That sounds great, but our enterprise network is really complicated. Knowing about all the different apps that we rely on would be impossible! What you're saying sounds reasonable until you think about it and realize how absurd it is!" To which I respond, "How can you call yourself a 'Chief Technology Officer' if you have no idea what your technology is doing?" A CTO isn't going to know detail about every application on the network, but if you haven't got a vague idea what's going on it's impossible to do capacity planning, disaster planning, security planning, or virtually any of the things in a CTO's charter.

    Editorial Note :

    I went through the pain of making the quote a footnote because a) Ranum's blog doesn't have the MP-WP select tool to render http://www.ranum.com/security/computer_security/editorials/dumb/?b=Why%20is&e=CTO%27s%20charter.#select correctly and the archive.is js select is unreliable across browsers, b) underscore how handy the tool is and c) I've learned a lot reading Ranum, you probably will too. []

  2. What percentage of Federal Reserve Notes do you reckon are digits on some server in a ~closet in Northern Jersey (no, not the Bailiwick of Jersey in the channel north of Normandy, the failed European colony south of the mouth of the Hudson River), hmm ? []

3 Comments »

  1. [...] you find yourself weighing whether or not it's in your interest to contribute to TMSR OS, consider some points [...]

    Pingback by Some Reasons Contributing to TMSR OS is +ev « Dorion Mode — December 19, 2019 @ 04:00

  2. [...] published 2 TMSR OS articles, The Mission and Vision Statement Genesis and Some Reasons Contributing to TMSR OS is +ev. I made the proposed deadlines on these, but the [...]

    Pingback by RMD review, Dec 14th-20th, 2019 « Young Hands Club — December 21, 2019 @ 05:19

  3. [...] Guidelines for TMSR OS to document established best practices. On December 16th, I published TMSR OS Mission and Vision Statement Genesis. On December 19th, I published Some Reasons Contributing to TMSR OS is [...]

    Pingback by TMSR OS, January 2020 Statement « Dorion Mode — January 27, 2020 @ 16:46

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